Dual purpose wood stove: heats your home and cooks your food

 Return to a more ancestral way of life. Cook on a wood stove.


Wood stoves are growing in popularity.  Many of us are constantly reviewing our lifestyles to see how we can reduce our outgoings and revert to more traditional and natural methods of running our house.  A wood stove can help both reduce our outgoings and return to a more ancestral way of life.




Your wood burning heat stove is primarily designed to heat a room.  Although not specifically designed to cook on, if the surface is large and flat enough to hold a pan, it can be used to heat food.


A wood cooking stove is designed for kitchen use.  But, again, the adjunct heat it emits will heat the surrounding area. This makes it dual purpose, just like the standard wood burning stove.



Benefits of dual purpose wood stoves

Kitchen stoves have the advantage of an inbuilt roasting oven Kitchen stoves have the advantage of an inbuilt roasting oven



The great thing about reframing your stove as dual purpose is you save resources.  In addition, a stove can prove valuable in an emergency.  During a lengthy winter power cut, you can, with a sufficient supply of fuel, simultaneously keep warm and cook a hearty meal (warming you from the inside).



Our tips for cooking on a wood stove

Cooking on a wood stove takes practice.  A stove has no temperature dials.  It takes some trial and error finding the hottest part of the stove. By moving your pan around, or lifting it off, you can vary the temperature — you’ll soon get the hang of it with some practice.  Also, experiment with different quantities and varieties of fuels, to modify the temperature.  We recommend kiln dried oak or ash, to achieve a nice steady even burn.


Preheat any pans on the stove before cooking.  This will speed up the cooking process.  Keep a constant eye on your food, rotating multiple pans to ensure an even distribution of heat throughout.  Regularly stir the contents.

 

Cooking with wood takes some getting used to. It's a visceral tactile process. Cooking with wood takes some getting used to. It's a visceral tactile process.

Keep an eye on the time, while getting used to cooking your wood stove.  Although you’ll eventually be able to cook by feel.  Cooking on a wood stove is visceral tactile process.  Smell the food as it cooks.  Hear it bubbling away.  Taste and season your food throughout.  These sensory experiences allow you to gauge the length of cooking needed.



Fancy the idea of cooking on a wood stove? Visit our restaurant section or contact us today to see what options we have for your home.

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