What not to burn in 2017

What not to burn in your woodburner


Everyone loves a wood fire. They're romantic, comforting and warming. If you choose the right fuel they're also a green and sustainable option. But if you're a log fire newbie, how do you know what not to burn?


Green wood

Tip: buy a moisture meter and ensure your firewood is seasoned to below 21% moisture. Tip: buy a moisture meter and ensure your firewood is seasoned to below 21% moisture.

If you make the mistake of burning logs that haven't been properly dried and seasoned, you'll soon know about it. They're difficult to light because they're still full of water, and they burn horribly throwing out plenty of smoke and particulates. Hardly very green.


Tip: Logs for your open fire or wood burner must be properly dried out - kiln dried with around 20% moisture are best - so they can burn with maximum efficiency.

 

Softwood

Fir and associated softwoods often don't burn for long. Fir and associated softwoods often don't burn for long.

Do your logs burn up too quickly? Then you're burning soft woods like pine or fir. Save these to get your fire started or for the campfire or an outdoor firepit.



Tip: Logs for firewood need to come from hard woods like oak and ash which burn slowly and generate a lot of heat.

Driftwood

Beware. Salty driftwood can be bad for you! Beware. Salty driftwood can be bad for you ;-)

It seems so romantic - collecting driftwood on the beach for burning later. But beware, the chlorine that accumulates in driftwood can cause carcinogenic compounds to form when burned. Best leave this on the beach where you found it - or make a lamp base.



Tip: For safety, only burn firewood and kiln dried logs from a trusted supplier so you know exactly what you're getting.

Logs

Bores of ordinary logs? Why not try Bracketts? Bores of ordinary logs? Why not try Bracketts?

Ok, so this is a controversial inclusion, but the range of alternative fuels seems to widen every day. There are bracken logs and briquettes made from sawdust that burn hotter and longer than even the best seasoned and kiln dried logs. The moisture content of most logs is 20% while briquettes and other alternatives generally have around 10% moisture to deliver more heat for your money.


Tip: At Logs Direct we stock a wide range of alternative fuels as well as kiln dried logs, so why not give Blazers Eco Logs or Brackenburn Brackettes a try? Or order both logs and eco fuels and see which burns best for you!


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