coal

  • Your multi-fuel stove doesn't need to produce smoke

    If you live in a built-up area, you may believe that you can’t use coal due to smoke control regulations. While you can't use old-fashioned coal, you can use smokeless coal.  Furthermore. there are steps you can take to ensure that you do not produce too much smoke when you burn coal. We’ve listed these steps in today’s blog entry, in order to help you reduce smoke from your stove or fireplace. By following these steps, you can ensure that your stove produces minimal quantities of smoke and can be used in  built-up areas. 1. Don’t overload coal ...
  • Combining logs and coal

    You probably think of firewood logs and coal as completely separate fuels. However, it is possible to burn them together. That’s right: you can burn coal and logs in your fireplace simultaneously. But why might you opt to combine these two fuels? The best of both worlds Coal and logs combined — the best of both worlds Burning coal and wood simultaneously allows you to get the best of both worlds. Coal lasts longer and produces more heat than logs, but logs have a more pleasant aroma and look far better in your wood burner. By using...
  • How much coal should you buy for winter?

    We stand poised on the threshold between autumn and winter, which means now is the perfect time to stock up on coal. In many respects, home coal is the ultimate winter fuel: it burns hotter than other fuels and you need less of it to maintain your home’s temperature for long periods. The cost of coal is also lower than you might expect, meaning that it is a surprisingly cost-efficient fuel. But how much should you stock up on before winter begins? To answer this question, you need to take several factors into consideration. 1. How much fuel will...
  • Your guide to the right fuel choice for autumn

    What is the best fuel for autumn? Coal, logs or peat? Are you currently deciding the optimum fuel choice to get you through Autumn? Autumn isn’t as severe and cold as winter. Yet, you’ll still need a reliable, powerful fuel source to keep you warm until winter hits. We have discussed the relative merits of different solid fuels before on the blog. Nonetheless, we feel it’s time to provide some season specific guidance. Here we’ll look at three major biomass fuel options — logs, coal and peat — specifically in relation to Autumn. We’ll elucidate the various merits...
  • Spring storage of wood fuel

    With spring just around the corner, you might think that it’s time to put away the winter fuel and turn off the fire or wood-burner until the winter months. Keep your wood dry and off the wet ground in spring However, Met Office records show that between 1981 to 2010, the average temperatures for spring in the UK were  between 7 and 13⁰C, meaning that a little extra help with heating the home is welcome. As you’ll be aware, any heating sources such as logs, coal or wood pellets need to be stored effectively to work as they...
  • How to make your coal fire more energy efficient

    There's something about an open fire that captures the im agination in a way that gas and electricity just can't match. As the temperature starts to drop and the nights begin to draw in, the idea of cosy winter nights around the fireplace can be very appealing. But while a coal fire can be aesthetically appealing, it can also require extra attention to get the best results. The first thing any homeowner should do when it comes to improving the energy efficiency of an open fire is to ensure that they're using the highest quality fuels. Our house coal is...
  • Coal - the rock that fueled a nation

    As winter approaches, we get closer to that archetypal British tradition of relaxing in front of a fire during the dark and often dreary winter months. When you take your first coal delivery of the winter, consider that 300 years ago, the dusty black, carbon-based, sedimentary rock you will use to warm your home played a vital role in allowing the United Kingdom to become one of the world's most rapidly evolving nations. British coal production had reached 16 million tonnes by the Napoleonic War in 1815, and the reason was down to its versatility. Town gas, homes, electricity...

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